Preamble

We, women and men, citizens of this planet, endorse this document, entitled the Mycotox Charter. In so doing, we make clear commitments concerning the right to food safety and mycotoxin management and regulation, which we believe should be fundamental to minimize the differences in access to sufficient and safe food for all humanity.
We consider the lack of this opportunity to access safe food to be a violation of human dignity.

We believe that only our collective action as citizens, together with civil society, businesses and local, national and international institutions, will make it possible to overcome the major challenges related to the reduction of mycotoxin contamination and to improve food safety at a global level. These challenges are:

  • impact of mycotoxins on human and animal health
  • combating undernutrition and malnutrition related to mycotoxin exposure of humans and animals
  • reducing waste of contaminated food and feed
  • ensuring sustainable management of production processes.

In signing the MycoKey Charter

  • we affirm the responsibility of the present generation to take action and implement practices and choices that also guarantee the reduction of mycotoxins in food and the improvement of food safety for future generations;
  • we commit to advocating political decisions that will enable achievement of the fundamental goal of harmonizing regulation of mycotoxins at a global level in order to support the more equitable access to safe food and feed worldwide.
Rights

We believe that

  • Mycotoxins are major food contaminants affecting global food security, especially in low and middle income countries.
  • Everyone has the right to have access to a sufficient quantity of safe, healthy and nutritious food, with mycotoxin content as low as reasonably achievable.
  • Mycotoxins are still a “largely ignored global health issue” (Wild and Gong, 2010, Carcinogenesis).
  • “There is a lack of action to tackle the problem of mycotoxins mostly in low-income countries and the reasons for it are undoubtedly complex and incompletely researched.”(Wild and Gong, 2010, Carcinogenesis)
  • Food spoilage caused by mycotoxins results in the contamination of over 25% of world’s food supply which aggravates the severe food insecurity facing the earth’s population.
  • Mycotoxin contaminated agricultural products are not fit for export and so fungi and mycotoxins impact negatively on international trade with consequent adverse effect on the world economy.
  • More that one mycotoxin may co-exist in feeds and food products resulting in a risk of combined or synergistic toxic effects.
  • New and emerging mycotoxins have been reported in food crops representing an important problem in some parts of the world.
  • GAP (Good Agricultural Practices) and GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) are important strategic measure to address mycotoxin problem.

We consider it unacceptable that

  • Many countries do not regulated mycotoxin levels in food and feed while recognizing that regulations are needed.
  • There are poor regulatory and control systems, especially in developing countries.
  • Informal and dispersed markets lack control resulting in a high risk of mycotoxin exposure.
  • Inspection and enforcement capabilities are often inadequate, mainly in developing countries.
  • Best quality food often exported; whereas poorer quality food is consumed domestically in countries not regulated.
  • Inspection and enforcement capabilities are often inadequate, mainly in developing countries.
  • Best quality food often exported; whereas poorer quality food is consumed domestically in countries not regulated.
  • There are still high trade losses due to aflatoxin contamination.
  • There are unjustifiable inequalities in the possibilities and opportunities for peoples to access food safe from mycotoxins.
  • People that suffer chronic hunger, are malnourished and have stunted growth are also highly exposed to mycotoxins.
  • Each year, thousands of tonnes of food produced for human consumption is wasted due to mycotoxin contamination.
  • Infants and other susceptible populations have a higher risk of suffering adverse health effects due to mycotoxins.
Awareness

We are aware that

  • The mycotoxin problem in public health is longstanding and all humans and animals are at risk for mycotoxin exposure.
  • The economic and health hazards of mycotoxin contamination in crops and food products present a huge challenge.
  • Another great challenge for the next decade is to mitigate the effect of climate change on crop production with a focus on sustaining crop and animal production levels with reduced contamination of mycotoxins.
  • Forthcoming global mycotoxin regulations and technology advances can help us managing mycotoxins risks.
  • Climate change could have an important impact on mycotoxin contamination of food by affecting disproportionally economically disadvantaged people.
  • Children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of mycotoxins, especially in developing countries.
  • The animal production industry is most commonly subclinically affected by mycotoxins.
  • As technology advances and with better analytical capabilities on the way, monitoring of traditional mycotoxins in foods may seem easier; however we may also see a great number of new emerging mycotoxins that may complicate the overall control of these food toxins.
  • Food scarcity will complicate mycotoxin management even more.
  • We are all inter-related and all responsible to promote improved conditions of access to adequate healthy food.
  • It is important to propagate the correct dietary education from childhood, including the need to reduce mycotoxin exposure.
  • Improvements in knowledge and practical experience on mycotoxin management in both traditional and advanced production methods is critical for the agricultural systems used on both family and industrial farms.
  • The lack of suitable biomarkers to assess exposure of humans and animals hinders our understanding of health effects of mycotoxin exposure.
Commitments

Since we know we are responsible for leaving a healthier, fairer, more sustainable world to future generations, as citizens, we commit to

  • taking care of the safety of food we eat, particularly its mycotoxin content in relation to regulations.
  • promote the establishment of technical offices within the national and regional hubs as proposed above will cushion these effects.
  • provide recommendations for mycotoxin regulations developed by key experts and industrial partners.
  • promoting dietary and environmental education in the family in relation to the reduction to mycotoxin exposure, so as to foster a responsible development for new generations.
  • provide farmers with relevant information for economic decisions/solutions to address a potential mycotoxin problem.
  • understanding and protecting the environment through responsible behavior and sound practices, such as recycling, remediation in view of reduction of mycotoxin risk in food.
  • playing an active role in building a sustainable safe food, with lower mycotoxin content, including innovative solutions, developed by our work, creativity and skills.

As members of civil society, we commit to

  • making our voices heard at all decision-making levels relevant to mycotoxin issues, so as to define projects for food safe from mycotoxin risk.
  • representing civil society bodies in debates and processes for shaping public policy on mycotoxin risk management.
  • growing the interest of the developing countries scientific community towards increasing the research output on mycotoxins in these areas.
  • building a human resource capacity in mycotoxicology.
  • strengthening and supplementing the international network of projects, actions and initiatives on mycotoxins and food safety.
  • identifying and reporting the critical issues in legislation governing the mycotoxin regulation at international level.
  • sustaining the relevance of new technologies for developing nations fundamental for the implementation of global regulations.

As businesses, we commit to:

  • guarantee access to quality food for all, we need a way to balance global mycotoxin standards with the realistic feasibility of reaching them, considering limitations of producers and designing strategies to reduce mycotoxin exposure based on sound research.
  • develop and set up new strategies to monitor and predict mycotoxin contamination either in specific foods or in geographical regions.
  • sustain the systematic development of centers of research expertise, and building research capacities aimed at establishing a database on health-related risks caused by mycotoxins.
  • promote the establishment of national and regional hubs of excellence for coordination of response.
  • investing in research, promoting a wider sharing of the results and developing it for the collective good, without distinction between the public and the private sector.
  • translate existing monitoring technologies into onsite/storage specific application tools for growers to record data and communicate with ICT systems.
  • improving production, conservation and logistics, so as to avoid (or eliminate) mycotoxin contamination and to minimize waste.
  • Translate existing monitoring technologies into onsite/storage specific application tools for growers to record data and communicate with ICT systems
  • improving production, conservation and logistics, so as to avoid (or eliminate) myctoxins contamination and to minimize waste.
  • producing and marketing healthy, safe food, informing consumers about the nutritional content, mycotoxin risk, and environmental impact and social implications promoting adequate packaging techniques, so as to reduce wastage and facilitate the disposal and recovery of used materials promoting innovations that inform consumers of consumption times that are compatible with the nature, quality, and means of preservation of food.
  • contributing to the sustainable development goals, by using innovative processes, products and services, and by adopting and practising codes of social responsibility.

Therefore in signing this MycoKey Charter, we women and men, citizens of this planet, strongly urge governments, institutions and international organizations to commit to

  • harmonize the regulations on mycotoxins that guarantee the right to food safety and food sovereignty and make them effective.
  • strengthening legislation to promote the new and international law for implementing the regulation of mycotoxins.
  • promoting the theme of nutrition and malnutrition in relation to mycotoxin contamination in international government forums, ensuring effective and concrete implementation of the undertakings at national level and coordination among specialized international organizations.
  • formulating and implementing legal rules and regulations regarding myctoxins in food and environmental safety that are easy to understand and apply.
  • promoting and disseminating the culture of a healthy and safe diet at low mycotoxin risk as a global health tool.
  • increasing resources for research and transferring its results, especially in developing countries that major suffering from mycotoxin exposure risk.
  • promoting international agreements for urban and rural food strategies for access to safe and nutritious food, which involves both the planet’s main metropolitan areas and the countryside;
  • increasing resources for research and transferring its results, especially in developing countries that major suffering from mycotoxin exposure risk;
  • developing national health service measures and policies that promote a healthy and sustainable diet and reduce unbalanced diets, paying particular attention on diet free or a low mycotoxins impact to people with special nutritional requirements.
Ending

Given that we believe in the possibility of a world with reduced risk of mycotoxin contamination and without chronic suffering from mycotoxicoses, and consider this a matter of human dignity, within the EU framework Horizon 2020 and the project Myco-Key, we commit to adopting the principles and practices outlined in this Mycotox Charter, in line with the strategy that the member states of the United Nations wish to reduce the problem of mycotoxins in food and related health hazards as it is evident from the numbers of EU and International projects funded on mycotoxin research.

By signing this Mycotox Charter, we declare our concrete and active support for the Sustainable Development Goals promoted by the United Nations.

A fair and sustainable future is our responsibility too.

SIGNED

By signing the MycoKey Charter, we declare our concrete and active support for the Sustainable Development Goals promoted by the United Nations.

shadow
Mycotox charter

We, women and men, citizens of this planet, endorse this document, entitled the Mycotox Charter. In so doing, we make clear commitments concerning the right to food safety and mycotoxin management and regulation, which we believe should be fundamental to minimize the differences in access to sufficient and safe food for all humanity.
We consider the lack of this opportunity to access safe food to be a violation of human dignity.

We believe that only our collective action as citizens, together with civil society, businesses and local, national and international institutions, will make it possible to overcome the major challenges related to the reduction of mycotoxin contamination and to improve food safety at a global level. These challenges are:

  • impact of mycotoxins on human and animal health
  • combating undernutrition and malnutrition related to mycotoxin exposure of humans and animals
  • reducing waste of contaminated food and feed
  • ensuring sustainable management of production processes.

In signing the MycoKey Charter

  • we affirm the responsibility of the present generation to take action and implement practices and choices that also guarantee the reduction of mycotoxins in food and the improvement of food safety for future generations;
  • we commit to advocating political decisions that will enable achievement of the fundamental goal of harmonizing regulation of mycotoxins at a global level in order to support the more equitable access to safe food and feed worldwide.

We believe that

  • Mycotoxins are major food contaminants affecting global food security, especially in low and middle income countries.
  • Everyone has the right to have access to a sufficient quantity of safe, healthy and nutritious food, with mycotoxin content as low as reasonably achievable.
  • Mycotoxins are still a “largely ignored global health issue” (Wild and Gong, 2010, Carcinogenesis).
  • “There is a lack of action to tackle the problem of mycotoxins mostly in low-income countries and the reasons for it are undoubtedly complex and incompletely researched.”(Wild and Gong, 2010, Carcinogenesis)
  • Food spoilage caused by mycotoxins results in the contamination of over 25% of world’s food supply which aggravates the severe food insecurity facing the earth’s population.
  • Mycotoxin contaminated agricultural products are not fit for export and so fungi and mycotoxins impact negatively on international trade with consequent adverse effect on the world economy.
  • More that one mycotoxin may co-exist in feeds and food products resulting in a risk of combined or synergistic toxic effects.
  • New and emerging mycotoxins have been reported in food crops representing an important problem in some parts of the world.
  • GAP (Good Agricultural Practices) and GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) are important strategic measure to address mycotoxin problem.

We consider it unacceptable that

  • Many countries do not regulated mycotoxin levels in food and feed while recognizing that regulations are needed.
  • There are poor regulatory and control systems, especially in developing countries.
  • Informal and dispersed markets lack control resulting in a high risk of mycotoxin exposure.
  • Inspection and enforcement capabilities are often inadequate, mainly in developing countries.
  • Best quality food often exported; whereas poorer quality food is consumed domestically in countries not regulated.
  • Inspection and enforcement capabilities are often inadequate, mainly in developing countries.
  • Best quality food often exported; whereas poorer quality food is consumed domestically in countries not regulated.
  • There are still high trade losses due to aflatoxin contamination.
  • There are unjustifiable inequalities in the possibilities and opportunities for peoples to access food safe from mycotoxins.
  • People that suffer chronic hunger, are malnourished and have stunted growth are also highly exposed to mycotoxins.
  • Each year, thousands of tonnes of food produced for human consumption is wasted due to mycotoxin contamination.
  • Infants and other susceptible populations have a higher risk of suffering adverse health effects due to mycotoxins.

We are aware that

  • The mycotoxin problem in public health is longstanding and all humans and animals are at risk for mycotoxin exposure.
  • The economic and health hazards of mycotoxin contamination in crops and food products present a huge challenge.
  • Another great challenge for the next decade is to mitigate the effect of climate change on crop production with a focus on sustaining crop and animal production levels with reduced contamination of mycotoxins.
  • Forthcoming global mycotoxin regulations and technology advances can help us managing mycotoxins risks.
  • Climate change could have an important impact on mycotoxin contamination of food by affecting disproportionally economically disadvantaged people.
  • Children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of mycotoxins, especially in developing countries.
  • The animal production industry is most commonly subclinically affected by mycotoxins.
  • As technology advances and with better analytical capabilities on the way, monitoring of traditional mycotoxins in foods may seem easier; however we may also see a great number of new emerging mycotoxins that may complicate the overall control of these food toxins.
  • Food scarcity will complicate mycotoxin management even more.
  • We are all inter-related and all responsible to promote improved conditions of access to adequate healthy food.
  • It is important to propagate the correct dietary education from childhood, including the need to reduce mycotoxin exposure.
  • Improvements in knowledge and practical experience on mycotoxin management in both traditional and advanced production methods is critical for the agricultural systems used on both family and industrial farms.
  • The lack of suitable biomarkers to assess exposure of humans and animals hinders our understanding of health effects of mycotoxin exposure.

Since we know we are responsible for leaving a healthier, fairer, more sustainable world to future generations, as citizens, we commit to

  • taking care of the safety of food we eat, particularly its mycotoxin content in relation to regulations.
  • promote the establishment of technical offices within the national and regional hubs as proposed above will cushion these effects.
  • provide recommendations for mycotoxin regulations developed by key experts and industrial partners.
  • promoting dietary and environmental education in the family in relation to the reduction to mycotoxin exposure, so as to foster a responsible development for new generations.
  • provide farmers with relevant information for economic decisions/solutions to address a potential mycotoxin problem.
  • understanding and protecting the environment through responsible behavior and sound practices, such as recycling, remediation in view of reduction of mycotoxin risk in food.
  • playing an active role in building a sustainable safe food, with lower mycotoxin content, including innovative solutions, developed by our work, creativity and skills.

As members of civil society, we commit to

  • making our voices heard at all decision-making levels relevant to mycotoxin issues, so as to define projects for food safe from mycotoxin risk.
  • representing civil society bodies in debates and processes for shaping public policy on mycotoxin risk management.
  • growing the interest of the developing countries scientific community towards increasing the research output on mycotoxins in these areas.
  • building a human resource capacity in mycotoxicology.
  • strengthening and supplementing the international network of projects, actions and initiatives on mycotoxins and food safety.
  • identifying and reporting the critical issues in legislation governing the mycotoxin regulation at international level.
  • sustaining the relevance of new technologies for developing nations fundamental for the implementation of global regulations.

As businesses, we commit to:

  • guarantee access to quality food for all, we need a way to balance global mycotoxin standards with the realistic feasibility of reaching them, considering limitations of producers and designing strategies to reduce mycotoxin exposure based on sound research.
  • develop and set up new strategies to monitor and predict mycotoxin contamination either in specific foods or in geographical regions.
  • sustain the systematic development of centers of research expertise, and building research capacities aimed at establishing a database on health-related risks caused by mycotoxins.
  • promote the establishment of national and regional hubs of excellence for coordination of response.
  • investing in research, promoting a wider sharing of the results and developing it for the collective good, without distinction between the public and the private sector.
  • translate existing monitoring technologies into onsite/storage specific application tools for growers to record data and communicate with ICT systems.
  • improving production, conservation and logistics, so as to avoid (or eliminate) mycotoxin contamination and to minimize waste.
  • Translate existing monitoring technologies into onsite/storage specific application tools for growers to record data and communicate with ICT systems
  • improving production, conservation and logistics, so as to avoid (or eliminate) myctoxins contamination and to minimize waste.
  • producing and marketing healthy, safe food, informing consumers about the nutritional content, mycotoxin risk, and environmental impact and social implications promoting adequate packaging techniques, so as to reduce wastage and facilitate the disposal and recovery of used materials promoting innovations that inform consumers of consumption times that are compatible with the nature, quality, and means of preservation of food.
  • contributing to the sustainable development goals, by using innovative processes, products and services, and by adopting and practising codes of social responsibility.

Therefore in signing this MycoKey Charter, we women and men, citizens of this planet, strongly urge governments, institutions and international organizations to commit to

  • harmonize the regulations on mycotoxins that guarantee the right to food safety and food sovereignty and make them effective.
  • strengthening legislation to promote the new and international law for implementing the regulation of mycotoxins.
  • promoting the theme of nutrition and malnutrition in relation to mycotoxin contamination in international government forums, ensuring effective and concrete implementation of the undertakings at national level and coordination among specialized international organizations.
  • formulating and implementing legal rules and regulations regarding myctoxins in food and environmental safety that are easy to understand and apply.
  • promoting and disseminating the culture of a healthy and safe diet at low mycotoxin risk as a global health tool.
  • increasing resources for research and transferring its results, especially in developing countries that major suffering from mycotoxin exposure risk.
  • promoting international agreements for urban and rural food strategies for access to safe and nutritious food, which involves both the planet’s main metropolitan areas and the countryside;
  • increasing resources for research and transferring its results, especially in developing countries that major suffering from mycotoxin exposure risk;
  • developing national health service measures and policies that promote a healthy and sustainable diet and reduce unbalanced diets, paying particular attention on diet free or a low mycotoxins impact to people with special nutritional requirements.

Given that we believe in the possibility of a world with reduced risk of mycotoxin contamination and without chronic suffering from mycotoxicoses, and consider this a matter of human dignity, within the EU framework Horizon 2020 and the project Myco-Key, we commit to adopting the principles and practices outlined in this Mycotox Charter, in line with the strategy that the member states of the United Nations wish to reduce the problem of mycotoxins in food and related health hazards as it is evident from the numbers of EU and International projects funded on mycotoxin research.

By signing this Mycotox Charter, we declare our concrete and active support for the Sustainable Development Goals promoted by the United Nations.

A fair and sustainable future is our responsibility too.

SIGNED

By signing the MycoKey Charter, we declare our concrete and active support for the Sustainable Development Goals promoted by the United Nations.

shadow